If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact me at

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact me at

I hope this report meets your needs, generated future studies, and educates the public about the environmentally friendly options available in home building today.

Cover Page and or Title Page

Almost all formal reports have a Cover or Title Page, perhaps both. These two pages are used in nearly identical ways, yet some report types or organizations require both with a slight modification to the page’s purpose.

A cover page is a very simple, precise, brief way to introduce your report to the reader. This should contain:

  • A specific title in large font
  • Company name
  • Name of the author(s)
  • Date of the report
  • Relevant picture

The use of a relevant picture or two can help reinforce the subject of the report. One goal of the cover page is to be informative and scalable because once it is filed, it will need to be easy to pick out of a stack of other reports. A second goal is to make the report stand out. If the report cover looks bleak and dull, the reader will start reading with a negative outlook. Think of the cover page of a report like the outfit you would wear to an interview. The cover page is the first thing that is seen: it will be the foundation for first impressions, for better or worse.

One easy way to make the report stand out is to use a theme for the report that your audience can connect to. For example, if a report is written to McDonald’s, the cover page will use yellows and reds, perhaps with the golden arches as a picture. With a carefully chosen color scheme and images, you can help the reader believe that he or she is the most important aspect of the report. As always, when you include graphics of any kind in a document you are sending out, be sure they don’t dramatically increase the file size, which can make the document hard to download, and that they transmit easily among devices and platforms.

The title page is an opportunity to provide more specific, detailed information about the document and its authors to its intended audience. It will be very similar to your front cover and it repeats the information on the cover, but adds more important details. This es and addresses of authors, specific contract information, the name and address of the supervisor, and the name and address of the organization that supported the report.

Title pages may be formally laid out according to MLA or APA formatting. However, most business and non-research institutions are relatively relaxed on the format. If you are creating a sales document that may become part of a contract, your company (or your potential customer) will list their particular requirements for the title page. With the power of word processing software, companies have started to use images on these pages as well as on covers. The best advice is usually to keep it simple and professional.These pages may be used with either informational or analytical reports.

Table of Contents, Tables of Exhibits, Tables of Illustrations

Formal reports are frequently lengthy and contain a Table of Contents to assist readers. There may also be tables of exhibits or illustrations if needed. The use of these sections in larger reports allows readers to quickly access the area of their interest: these sections list important headings or figures in the report alongside their corresponding pages. These sections may be used with either Informational or Analytical reports.

Table of Contents

Typically this is one of the last sections of the document to be created, since it relies on the body of the report https://www.maxloan.org/installment-loans-nv/ to be generated. This may be used in either informational or analytical reports.

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published.